The Dance of Death

Nathan knew that Songo had a construed view of death.  The last time they had talked about it, Songo had only touched on the subject. Nathan thought now was an appropriate time to resume the talk.
“According to you, what do you think happens after our lives are over?” Nathan asked Songo.
Songo looked attentively at Nathan, guessing all the questions that the latter had in mind.
“That question is sufficiently important that we need to give it time to address it properly and thoroughly.” Songo said.
Songo pointed to a large tree at the top of a small hill and said: “Let’s go sit under that tree. Its shade will keep us cool.” Once there, Songo continued:
“What I’m going to tell you are the convictions of an old man based on an existence consecrated to prolonging life here on earth, and therefore delaying to later what comes after.”
“That’s only making me even more curious!” Nathan expressed.
“We can divide into three groups the people that need healing. In the first group, time has not yet decided to send death. To heal these people, knowledge and experience is sufficient.
“Time?” Nathan asked.
“It’s time that decides when death will dance?” Songo said.
“Death can dance?” Nathan asked intrigued.
“Yes, it does so when it comes to get someone.”
“Dancing? But certainly, death is not something to be joyful about!” Nathan stated. Continue reading

Sin…

 

What is your view on “sin”?

Many people are raised with the conviction that “sin” is an act of disobedience towards a god, who not only is a separate entity from them, but can also inflict punishment. Based on this perception of “God”, certain deeds are condemned as not being in accordance with His Laws. These people consider themselves, and others, as sinners, and consequently, are overburdened with feelings of guilt. This leads to a life of fear and self-contempt because they are afraid of not being forgiven by this God. When people realize that “God”, “Consciousness”, “Love” and “Reality”, refer to the same thing, with only minor conceptual differences, then they’ll realize that God has always been with them. This is when they’ll feel liberated and experience life with more joy.

What happens to us after death?

What happens to us after death?

This question raises another question: who are we- or better yet- what dies?  We’ve given ourselves an identity- which is none other than a product of our conditioning- by seeing ourselves as a real and lasting person. But where is this person? On what do we base this? Examining this in a perceptive way and inviting the mind to enter into another dimension—the Absolute— we realize that life and death are but phases of one and the same existence.